What Grows Well With Pumpkins? 12 Must-Try Ideas

Your pumpkin will be lonely when grown alone. Why don’t you fill the space with some other species? If you choose the right companion plants, your pumpkins can even grow faster. 

So what grows well with pumpkins? What should you avoid adding to your pumpkin garden? Let’s scroll down for the answers! 

What Grows Well With Pumpkins?

What Grows Well With Pumpkins

Your pumpkin may suffer from pests. Although some of them, like bugs or aphids, can ruin your healthy pumpkin, others will stimulate its development.

You need to space your pumpkins properly. If possible, grow some plants in between. Those plants will keep diseases and pests away from the pumpkins.

If you like this idea, try the following species: 

More pumpkins

Since the patch draws beneficial squash bees, pumpkin plants thrive when there are many of them in one place. Although the males of these bees resemble honeybees, they prefer to rest inside the squash blossoms. 

Squash bees also help with the pollination of squash, cucumbers, melons, zucchini, and other plants. Yet, since squash bees make their nests in the ground, avoid digging the garden soil.

Corn

Pumpkins can use corn as a supporter. The trellis is necessary for the pumpkin’s stalk to intertwine as a climbing plant. Hence, you can make your pumpkin more helpful if you grow corn beside it.

Pumpkins benefit the crop by removing weeds and giving the corn wet soil. As a result, we can be certain that they can make perfect partners. 

Nasturtium

Including nasturtium in your pumpkin crop has many benefits. Some gardeners worry about the nasturtium blossom attracting predators and pollinators that can eat your pumpkins. Yet, the ladybug, a nasturtium enthusiast, eats the predators. This insect takes care of all potential attacks on your pumpkins. 

Lavender

Flowers are always an attractive source for pollinators. If you grow lavender flowers alongside your pumpkins, bees will come close and pollinate them. Your pumpkins can also benefit from the aroma of lavender flowers. 

Marigolds

Aphids are among the biggest enemies of many crops because they prevent the plants from flourishing. How to keep them away from your pumpkins? Marigold will be a terrific solution.

Pests don’t attack marigolds. This species can also eliminate nematodes that cause harm to your plant’s roots. 

Hubbard Squash

Hubbard is a variety of squash, like pumpkins. It makes an excellent trap crop since pumpkin insects, like squash vine borers or bugs, love it a lot. 

You can grow the hubbard squash about two weeks before working with the pumpkins. Remember to keep them a few feet away from your pumpkins. 

Melons

Melons and pumpkins are similar in that they need bees to pollinate. Melons also attract earthworms to aerate the soil.

Furthermore, melons are rich in nutrients. They grow into healthy plants and add nutrient-rick elements to your pumpkins, helping them thrive. 

Peas

One of the best plant companions for any crop is cover crops. Plants, like peas, enrich the soil with nitrogen. They improve the soil and encourage the growth of stronger pumpkins as well. 

Radishes

Flea beetles love pumpkins, but they prefer eating radishes. Hence, it’s a good idea to use radishes as bait to remove all of those pests. 

Carrots

Pumpkins do not go well with root vegetables. They demand abundant nutrients and dislike having their growth hindered by deep roots.

However, this combination is not always a bad idea. As long as you don’t plant the carrots too close to the pumpkins, they will help attract pollinators, improving the fruit’s development. 

Dill

Cabbage worms won’t lay eggs in your pumpkin leaves if you grow dill around your crop. This herb has a pleasant scent that lures many beneficial insects to come.

What’s more, dill’s blooming time aligns with that of the pumpkin blossoms. Such a fantastic combination for a successful crop! 

Lettuce

Lettuce is a small plant that you can slip easily between the pumpkins. Since lettuce’s roots are short, they won’t compete with pumpkins for nutrients or space.

Additionally, lettuce grows swiftly, so you can grow it even if there are surrounding pumpkin plants.

What Not To Plant With Pumpkins?

What Not To Plant With Pumpkins

Pumpkins are easy to grow, but choosing their companions is not simple. Avoid these species at all costs when planting pumpkin plants. 

Brassica

Every gardener must be familiar with the Brassica family. Its members, including kohlrabi, cauliflower, and kales, all compete with other plants in the same garden for nutrients. 

Pumpkins have their vitamins in their seeds and leaves. If you don’t want your plants to be deficient in these vital nutrients, keep Brassica species away from them. 

Vine plants

Vine plants include berries, peppers, grapes, and watermelons. Your pumpkins are crawling plants, which may confuse them with those vine plants. Because of how similar they are, trying to separate them could cause harm to both. 

Root vegetables

Plants with deep roots and tubers, like onions and potatoes, are terrible companions for your pumpkins. They will destroy the pumpkin roots someday. 

Moreover, root vegetables occupy too much space in your garden. How can your pumpkins grow and compete for nutrients? Hence, exclude these species from your list at the first stage.  

Pumpkin Companion Planting Tips

If you want to get the most out of your crop, stick to a few rules as follows: 

  • Warmer temps are better for pumpkin development. 
  • Every plant needs sunlight, but pumpkins demand more sun than other crops. Ensure your plant gets six to eight hours of direct sunlight daily.
  • Give the plants enough space to expand properly.
  • Because pumpkins require a lot of water to flourish, you should regularly water your crop.
  • Never grow pumpkins near vines or plants with deep roots.

Conclusion 

If you’ve never tried planting your pumpkins with any companion, here is the time. You won’t go wrong with it as long as you choose the right plant to grow. 

Comment below with your experiences growing companion pumpkins. That’s how you can have a more successful crop next time. 

Thank you for reading! 

For over eighty years the Wightman Family has been growing and selling fruits and vegetables at the farm.

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